ABOUT

Lois Raimondo’s first journalism job was translating
 for CBS News during President Reagan’s 1984 trip to China. At the time, she was a student living in a small Chinese village collecting folktales for a masters degree in Comparative Literature from Indiana University. Most recently, Raimondo worked for ten years as a staff photographer at 
The Washington Post. In-between, she
 was based primarily in Asia, reporting 
from China, Tibet, India and Vietnam. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, Time, Newsweek, New York Newsday,Paris Match, Stern, Smithsonian Magazine and many other publications. Raimondo is the rare journalistic talent who has achieved top honors as both a reporter and a photographer, recognized for her ability to create narrative on multiple platforms. Her frontline reporting from the war in Afghanistan was recognized with the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting. While at New York Newsday, she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for her investigative reporting work on corruption in Mitchell Lama housing. She was awarded an Alicia Patterson Fellowship to support her work on the rise of Islamic Fundamentalism in Waziristan. She is currently the Shott Chair in Journalism at the WVU Reed College of Media.

 

Artist Statement:

 

Fractured Spaces: Stories of Resistance and Resilience

 

“Today, in post-9/11 America, when the country has undergone a cataclysmic shift in polarizing perspectives, and sectarian violence is on the rise throughout the world, it is more critical than ever that we engage globally to understand why. Introducing strangers, even enemies, through unguarded moments of other—the stillness of the frozen photographic moment— creates a safe space where mindfulness, curiosity, and even compassion may grow. My hope is that the bold viewer finds means to enter the frame and recognize some piece of her or himself within. Emotional honesty requires vulnerability, a condition with power to disarm prejudicial distancing. Real understanding is possible in the dissolve.

LOIS RAIMONDO

 

SHOW INTRO:

 

Fractured Spaces: Stories of Resistance and Resilience, a large-scale Photojournalism Exhibition by Lois Raimondo, represents her work focusing on communities disrupted and dislocated by political and cultural conflict. Iraqis living with uncertainty on every level, daily bombings, IED attacks, and the complete dismantling of their country’s infrastructure; Afghan Northern Alliance soldiers seizing the military moment to take back their country from the Taliban after six years dug in, exiles at home, defending remote unforgiving isolated mountain peaks; 90,000 Tibetans living as political refugees in the Himalayan foothills of Dharamsala, India with their leader, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, striving to maintain critical core pieces of the Tibetan culture they left behind when fleeing their homeland fifty-six years back; and a small group of Pakistani women, “social corruption bombs,” locked together in a government safe house for “Endangered women and Children”. Each situation radically different in detail and texture, but sharing amongst them, family redefined, and a layered portrait of human resilience.

 

 

ABOUT FRACTURED SPACES:

 

Fractured Spaces: Stories of Resistance and Resilience is a large-scale International Photojournalism Project, conceived of in 2015, grant-funded the same year, designed, edited, produced, and fully installed at three different sites, partially at two others, in five different states in the four years following. Fractured Spaces was conceived, and designed, to be a movable feast, a live “working” project, with extensive programming, community outreach, and student engagement developed for each location.

 

Fractured Spaces has been invited, and displayed/utilized, at each host location for six to ten months. Creator Lois Raimondo was invited to serve as artist-in-residence at both Brown and Missouri openings, moderating discussions, and lecturing on topics as diverse as “The Anthropology of Refugee Migration” and “The Complexities of Responsible Reporting Cross-Culturally on Violence Against Women”.

 

Content includes 70 photographs mounted on 30×40 and 13×20 frameless boards; twelve silk photo-printed textiles 4’x5’ and 3’x6’ with rod and pulley mounting system; seven individual stories written for each “chapter” of the show; four contextual information charts researched and developed from archival and interview sources; captions throughout; and graphic design pieces numbering near to 50. Full content list at Location Site website page.

 

 

September 2015-August 2016.     WISE LIBRARY AT WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

 

  • Audience Reach: More than 1 million visitors/patrons passed through Wise Library in the time Fractured Spaces covered walls on three floors and textile photographs fluttered top to bottom of the spiral staircase.

 

October 13- 17 2016.     NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, MARQUETTE, MICHIGAN

 

  • Four-day residency and Keynote speaker on “The Complexities of responsible reporting on Violence Against Women across Culture”. The NMU invitation came as their campus was focused on raising awareness of violence against women. A faculty selection committee, representing five different departments, selected Fractured Spaces’ “The Safe House” and additional reporting work on Honor Killings in Pakistan’s Tribal areas of Baluchistan and Waziristan for campus-wide Keynote address.

 

February 13- July 30 2017.   BROWN UNIVERSITY WATSON INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL & PUBLIC AFFAIRS REPORTING

 

  • Vetted through application process through Brown’s Art Committee which voted unanimously to host Fractured Spaces as their major Exhibition for 2017.

 

March 24 – April 21, 2018.         NEW YORK MILLS POND GALLERY

 

  • Peer-reviewed and vetted for inclusion in the Mills Gallery International Photojournalism Exhibition “Documentary Photography Now,” Curated by Cosmos editor Kevin Downs.

 

Fall 2018 – Ongoing     UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI REYNOLDS JOURNALISM INSTITUTE

  • The University of Missouri Reynolds Journalism Institute Exhibition Hall, McDougall Center Gallery Lee Hills Hall and Reynolds Journalism Institute Palmer Room